New York Dentist | Dry Mouth and Tooth Decay

Are you constantly in need of a drink of water to moisten your dry mouth? Always, looking for gum or mints throughout the day to keep your mouth moist? You may be suffering from a medical condition called dry mouth or xerostomia. You might think it’s just an uncomfortable situation that you can learn to deal with. What you don’t know is that it can lead to tooth decay.

Why do I have dry mouth?

  • Naturally occurring: predisposed to having inadequate or sticky saliva
  • Medication induced: there are over 3,000 medications listing dry mouth as a side effect
  • Cancer treatment: radiation and chemotherapy
  • Genetic disorders: Sjogren’s Syndrome
  • Mouth breathing

A lack of saliva reduces your body’s ability to fight cavities. Saliva neutralizes the acids from food and acidic bacteria.

7 Easy Ways to beat dry mouth

  1. Use xylitol gum or alkaline saliva substitutes. It stimulates saliva productions and reduces acid production.
  2. Use a 0.05% sodium fluoride rinse with xylitol and neutralizing pH.
  3. Limit sugary foods and acidic beverages (soda, coffee, tea and alcohol).
  4. Drink plenty of water.
  5. Look for alternative medications that do not leave the mouth dry.
  6. Brush and Floss regularly.
  7. Use only alcohol free mouth rinses.

Contact New Dimension Dentistry in New York and inquire about how you can combat dry mouth and tooth decay. Office: 212-750-4590 or www.newdimensiondentistry.com.

 Accepting patients from New York, Hoboken NJ, Manhattan, Midtown, Brooklyn, Elmhurst and all surrounding areas.

 

 

Pediatric Dental New York | 7 Ways to Protect Your Child’s Oral Health

When the toddler came to her office, 4 of his 16 teeth were so decayed, they required dental crowns.

Although this case may sound shocking, it’s not rare, says Beverly Largent, DMD, the Paducah, Ky., dentist who cared for the child. She tells parents it’s crucial to care for baby teeth. “You need to brush from the first tooth,” says Largent, past president of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

In fact, tooth decay — although largely preventable with good care — is one of the most common chronic diseases of children ages 6 to 11 and teens ages 12 to 19. Tooth decay is five times more common than asthma and seven times more common than hay fever in children, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. By kindergarten age, more than 40% of kids have tooth decay.

Neglecting baby teeth is not the only misstep parents can make when it comes to their child’s early oral health.

Here’s your 7-step game plan.

Start Oral Care Early

Your child should see a dentist by the time he or she is a year old, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

Getting preventive care early saves money in the long run, according to a report published by the CDC. The report found that costs for dental care were nearly 40% lower over a five-year period for children who got dental care by age one compared to those who didn’t go to the dentist until later.

Teach the Brush & Floss Habit

Dental visits are just part of the plan, of course. Tooth brushing is also crucial from the start.  ”A lot of people think they don’t have to brush baby teeth,” Largent says. If your baby has even one tooth, it’s time to start tooth brushing. “If there’s just one tooth, you can use gauze.”

Even before your baby has teeth, you can gently brush the gums, using water on a soft baby toothbrush, or clean them with a soft washcloth.

Once there are additional teeth, Largent tells parents to buy infant toothbrushes that are very soft. Brushing should be done twice daily using a fluoridated toothpaste.

Flossing should begin when two teeth touch each other. Ask your dentist to show you the right flossing techniques and schedules, Largent says.

Also ask for your dentist’s advice on when to start using mouthwash. “I advise parents to wait until the child can definitely spit the mouthwash out,” says Mary Hayes, DDS, a pediatric dentist in Chicago and consumer advisor for the American Dental Association. “Mouthwash is a rinse and not a beverage.”

So how long until Junior can be responsible for brushing his own teeth? “[Parents] have to clean the teeth until children are able to tie their shoes or write in cursive,” says Largent.

During dental visits, ask your dentist if your child’s teeth need fluoride protection or a dental sealant.

And remember, the most important time to brush and floss is just before bedtime. No food or drink, except water, should be permitted until the next morning. This allows clean teeth to re-mineralize during the night, from the minerals in the saliva and toothpaste.

Beware of Mouth-Unfriendly Medicines

Many medications that children take are flavored and sugary, says Hayes. If they stick on the teeth, the risk for tooth decay goes up.

Children on medications for chronic conditions such as asthma and heart problems often have a higher decay rate, she finds.

Antibiotics and some asthma medications can cause an overgrowth of candida (yeast), which can lead to a fungal infection called oral thrush. Suspect thrush if you see creamy, curd-like patches on the tongue or inside the mouth.

“If your child is on chronic medications, ask your child’s dentist how often you should brush,” Hayes says. You may be advised to help your child brush as often as four times a day.

Stand Firm on Oral Hygiene

Parents often tell Hayes that their children put up a fuss when it comes time to brush, floss, and rinse, so parents relent and don’t keep up with oral care at home as they should.

Hayes strongly advises these parents to let their children know they don’t have a choice about taking care of their teeth and gums.

“It has to be done,” Hayes says. But she understands that children can get cranky and difficult. She suggests these tips to coax reluctant brushers and flossers to get the job done — or if they are too young, to allow their parents to help them do it.

  • Plan to help your children longer than you may think necessary. “Children don’t have the fine motor skills to brush their own teeth until about age 6,” says Hayes. Flossing skills don’t get good until later, probably age 10.
  • Schedule the brushing and flossing and rinsing, if advised, at times when your child is not overly tired. You may get more cooperation from a child who isn’t fatigued.
  • Get your child involved in a way that’s age-appropriate. For instance, you might let a child who is age 5 or older pick his own toothpaste at the store, from options you approve. You could buy two or three different kinds of toothpaste and let the child choose which one to use each time. You may offer him a choice of toothbrushes, including kid-friendly ones that are brightly colored or decorated.
  • Figure out what motivates your child. A younger child may gladly brush for a sticker, for instance, or gold stars on a chart.

In addition, preventative routine dental checkups ensure your child has healthy teeth and gums. Don’t wait. Schedule your child’s next pediatric dental visit with New Dimension Dentistry at 212-750-4590 or visit our website at www.newdimensiondentistry.com.

New Dimension Dentistry also proudly serves Hoboken, Manhattan, Midtown, Brooklyn, Elmhurst and surrounding areas.

 

Restorative Dentistry Treatment Options | New York Dentist

New Dimension Dentistry of New York is proud to offer the best in cosmetic and restorative dentistry. Dr. Doris Giraldo believes in overall wellness and in making a personal connection with each patient, so that she can offer the best custom treatment plan for each individual.

Learning your personal history, your present condition of oral health and wellness and your future expectations helps to establish which type of treatment options are right for you; whether it is preventative care, esthetic treatments or restorative dentistry.

Dr. Giraldo has an array of cosmetic, restorative and general dental treatment options are unsurpassed. The following is just an example of some of the treatment options available:

  • Dental Crowns and Dental Bridges
  • Dental Bonding
  • Root Canal Therapy
  • Gum Disease Therapy
  • Restorative Fillings
  • Dental Implants
  • Dentures and partials

Dr. Giraldo and her staff are committed to ensuring your optimal oral health and well-being.  Schedule an appointment today for a comprehensive exam and start on the road to a healthier, beautiful smile. Contact New Dimension Dentistry at 212-750-4590 or visit our website at www.newdimensiondentistry.com.

Proudly accepting patients from New York, Hoboken NJ, Manhattan, Midtown, Brooklyn, Elmhurst and all surrounding areas.

New York Dentist | Restore with Restorations!

Dental Restorations refer to cosmetic procedures that improve the health and appearance of teeth. Patients in need of dental restorations usually suffer damaged or worn down teeth. Restorations are essential in restoring the function of your teeth, such as chewing abilities. When individuals have decayed or injured teeth, chewing can be a painful process that can be solved by dental restorations. Thanks to Dr. Giraldo and her years of expertise, patients no longer have to endure the excruciating pain of tooth damage.

Restorations also drastically enhance the appearance of teeth! For individuals with missing teeth, restorations will fill in any gaps for a natural looking smile. For patients with chipped teeth, dental restorations will repair the chip and improve your smile. For those individuals who suffer from tooth decay, dental restorations will also your teeth to be fully functional while adding a healthy look to your smile!

For more information on dental restoration and you can benefit from them call Dr. Giraldo of New Dimension Dentistry in New York, NY at 212-750-4590 or visit www.newdimensiondentistry.com.

Dr. Giraldo of New Dimension Dentistry also proudly accepts patients from New York, Hoboken, Manhattan, Midtown, Brooklyn, Elmhurst, and surrounding areas.